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A Guide to Coffee Roasting Green coffee beans are naturally soft, spongy to the bite and smells like grass, but when it’s dried and roasted, the deep aroma and flavor of the coffee comes out and produces a staple ingredient to one of the world’s best brewed drink – coffee. When roasting the green coffee beans, the gradual building up of heat helps in causing chemical changes to take place in the beans, such that when the desired temperature is reached, the beans are in a roasted appearance and a roasted aroma is emitted which is uniquely characteristic of coffee. Green coffee beans contain levels of amino acids, protein, sugars and caffeine, a stimulant which is linked with the central nervous system, but as soon as they are roasted, a Maillard reaction takes place, which is a chemical reaction between amino acids and sugars take place, and the effect is brown, roasted beans that possess a distinct aroma and flavor. The art of roasting coffee is an accumulation of years of training, expertly reading when the beans are on the roasted temperature and time, which can make a difference between good aroma and flavor and a burnt flavor. The roasting is left into the expert’s hands to produce four different levels of roast coffee, which are – light, medium, medium-dark, and dark. All categories give that aromatic smell but the flavor of each differs.
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Coffee roasters know when the coffee beans are roasted into which category based on the sound it produces during roasting and at specific temperatures, such that at 196 degrees Centigrade the first crack sound is produced, marking the beginning of a light roast coffee, and at 224 degrees Centigrade, the second crack is sounded.
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When the roasting is just enough to produce a light roast coffee, the following characteristics of this coffee comes out – light brown color, mild taste, and no visible oil on the surface of the roasted beans. Light roast coffee are marketed into familiar names, such as Light City, Half City, and Cinnamon Coffee. Medium roast coffee is of medium brown, has a stronger flavor than light roast coffee and, still, non-oily. Their special names come as City Coffee, American Coffee, and Breakfast Coffee. For medium dark roast coffee, the results come out as a rich, dark color coffee, slightly oily, and having a bittersweet aftertaste. Full City coffee is popularly its commercial name. These are the distinct characteristics of dark roast coffee – shiny due to the oil that comes out during roasting, has a bitter taste, less acidity and slightly dark to charred color. These are the popular names of dark roast coffee beans – High, Continental, New Orleans, European, Espresso, Viennese, Italian, and French.